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Happy Dyslexia awareness day!

On average, one in three children in every UK classroom is dyslexic, which amounts to around 1.2 million. This means that a number of those who come to Inkpots face challenges with reading, writing and comprehension. To celebrate Dyslexia Awareness Day, we’ve put together some resources that may help you in supporting your child, particularly if they have recently been diagnosed. Dyslexia is classed as a specific learning difficulty, but we hope these services show that no one should let dyslexia hold them back in achieving their goals!

British Dyslexia Association (BDA) – as well as offering a wealth of general information about dyslexia, the BDA also suggests ways to find a credible dyslexia assessor for your child and runs a helpline if you’re looking for further support. They are a brilliant starting point if you’re wondering if your child may be dyslexic.

Helen Arkell – The Helen Arkell team offers dyslexia assessments and consultations for parents and provides tips on making reading, writing and spelling easier. There’s also help for your child as they move through education or are considering applying for university.

Education Angel – Sue Hall is a specialist teacher, building the confidence of dyslexic children and giving support to their parents. She offers consultations, coaching and workshops with personalised guidance to help dyslexic children thrive and has some great advice on how to view dyslexia positively. With back to school season upon us, her primary to secondary transition advice may be useful too!

If your child is dyslexic and interested in joining an Inkpots after school club, don’t be deterred! We’re always happy to make our resources as accessible as possible and make any specific adjustments required.

If you’re also after some dyslexia friendly books, look out for reads published by Barrington Stoke: they print their books with larger print and on speciality paper, making them super readable. Many authors and illustrators themselves are dyslexic, including Maggot Moon author Sally Gardener and Tom Gates creator Liz Pichon, which shows that aspiring creatives shouldn’t be discouraged.

Lucy

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